Data breaches are on the rise.  So are the lawsuits that follow.  This has led to an environment where cyber-forensics service providers are more important than ever.  Clients seeking these services, however, often do so after becoming the unwilling victims of a data breach.  And those circumstances create uncertainty for protecting — either as attorney-client

2023 has seen a flurry of general state privacy laws, with twelve (12) such laws now on the books.  The next one to “go live,” on December 31, 2023, is the Utah Consumer Privacy Act (UCPA).  With no general federal privacy law in sight, the state privacy landscape continues to get more crowded and challenging

As consumer demand for new artificial intelligence (“AI”) tools continues to grow, businesses must be prepared to build tools with “privacy by design” principles in mind, and to remain educated about privacy best practices and risk mitigation strategies when working with AI. The following areas provide the greatest opportunities to manage data privacy risks and

To say that class action litigation regarding the use or collection of “biometric information” – such as fingerprints, face records, or voice records – is expensive would be a gross understatement.  The damages sought, and sometimes recovered, in litigation under the Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act and similar laws that impose statutory penalties can be

If you manage a company that collects and otherwise processes personal data (which is just about every company, these days), you may need to protect your own pocketbook.  As governments across the globe continue to enact and enforce data privacy, data protection, and cybersecurity laws, data becomes more readily available, and the volume of incidents

In a recent letter to insurers, the New York State Department of Financial Services (“NYDFS”) acknowledged the key role cyber insurance plays in managing and reducing cyber risk – while also warning insurers that they could be writing policies that have the “perverse effect of increasing cyber risk.” If a cyber insurance policy does not

Businesses are instituting widespread remote work policies and procedures to facilitate social distancing and “flatten the curve.” Enterprises simultaneously need to be mindful of increased data privacy and security risks. The risks can range from pandemic-related phishing emails to increased pressure on network architecture to well-intentioned employee shortcuts. Hackers will try to take advantage of

As states fill the legal void for consumer privacy rights,[1] a new federal standard has emerged to assist companies with their compliance efforts. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (“NIST”) Privacy Framework (“PF”) was released last month to help organizations manage the risks associated with their data processing activities.

What the PF Does

Scammers are always seeking new ways to target victims for Business Email Compromise (BEC) scams, where they leverage email to try to convince you to give them credentials, send them confidential information like W2s, send them money by changing things like direct deposit instructions, or give any other data that can help them profit from

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) announced recently that it has launched a collaborative project to develop a voluntary privacy framework to help organizations manage risk. According to NIST Director Walter G. Copan, “The development of a privacy framework through an open process of stakeholder engagement is intended to