Tag: ransomware

Digital Transformation – Cybersecurity Lessons from Recent Lawsuits

Digital transformation,[1] the process of leveraging technology, people and processes to innovate, requires an “all-in, ongoing commitment to improvement.”[2] But the main drivers of digital transformation – data and profits – don’t always mesh seamlessly. As shown by recent class actions filed against Blackbaud and Morgan Stanley, and a settlement with the New York Attorney General … Continue Reading

Is Your Incident Response Plan Ready for Novel Computer Viruses?

A “novel” virus is one that has not been previously identified, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.[1]  In 2000, like the COVID-19 virus that was officially named on February 11, 2020, the ILOVEYOU virus became a global pandemic for data systems.  Within days, millions of computers were infected as the virus compromised … Continue Reading

Soon, All Ransomware Attacks May Be Data Breaches

As this recent article illustrates, many ransomware operators are now collecting information from victims before encrypting their data, and then threatening to release what they’ve collected – or actually releasing some of it – to increase the chance they’ll get paid. There have been many cases already where at least a portion of data has … Continue Reading

Your Security Program Must Think Beyond Malware Protection

According to Crowdstrike’s most recent Global Threat Report, in 2019 they observed that malware-free attacks – attacks  where malicious files are not written to disk – outpaced malware attacks by 51% to 49%. In Malware-free attacks, the attackers leverage Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTPs) that are less likely to be detected by traditional anti-malware solutions.  … Continue Reading

Utah Considers a Cybersecurity Safe Harbor as Ransomware Runs Riot

Last year the FTC mandated what an organization’s written cybersecurity program should include to avoid being deemed “unfair and deceptive” to consumers,[1] and this year California consumers whose personal information is compromised may file lawsuits against organizations that failed to implement “reasonable security.”[2] But several states provide legal safe harbors to organizations with written cybersecurity programs. … Continue Reading

Cyber thieves will target anything they can hold for ransom

Back in August, the Associated Press ran this article profiling how a North Carolina manufacturer has been attacked twice by cyber criminals looking to install malware and cripple the “just-in-time” nature of their operations so that they’d be willing to pay a ransom to return to production. While this manufacturer avoided paying the ransom so far, … Continue Reading
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