Romaine Marshall

Romaine Marshall

Romaine Marshall helps clients protect their data, businesses, and reputations from cybersecurity and privacy incidents.

As a cybersecurity and privacy lawyer, he works with clients to properly secure and use electronic data, develop industry-specific cybersecurity programs, conduct risk assessments and internal privacy audits, and respond to regulatory investigations. He has represented clients in more than 100 incidents involving data breaches, ransomware, malware attacks, security misconfigurations, wire fraud, software vulnerabilities, social engineering, and other exploits.

Subscribe to all posts by Romaine Marshall

CCPA Is Here – Is Your Security “Reasonable”?

Under the California Consumer Privacy Act, any California consumer whose personal information is compromised “as a result of the business’ violation of the duty to implement and maintain reasonable security procedures and practices … may institute a civil action.”[1] Consumers can initiate this private right of action right now, whereas other consumer rights can only … Continue Reading

CCPA is Here – Are Your Agreements Ready?

On January 1, 2020, if your company sells goods or services to California consumers and meets certain criteria,[1] the agreements you have with companies that handle personal information on your behalf should be analyzed and, if necessary, updated just as your privacy notices should be updated.[2] Examples of companies that handle personal information on a … Continue Reading

Achieving Industry Standards

For Cybersecurity and Privacy, “What Are the Industry Standards? Are We Meeting Them?” These are questions the FTC Chairman, Joseph Simons, strongly suggested a CEO must ask before a data breach occurs to avoid the prospect of personal liability. These questions and statements by other commissioners emphasizing the FTC’s role – to bring about a … Continue Reading

Recent FTC Enforcement Actions

What the FTC Wants, the FTC (Mostly) Gets In recent weeks the Federal Trade Commission has been on a tear. As one example, on July 22 it announced a $700 million settlement with Equifax for “the 2017 data breach that jeopardized the personal data of a staggering 147 million people.” But it is a decision … Continue Reading
LexBlog